Kallidus

Company news from LMS and Talent management vendor Kallidus, along with some useful hints and tips to improve e-learning and learning technologies in the organisation. Check out the Kallidus Blog...

Selecting an LMS

The LMS – Learning Management System, often in education circles referred to as a Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) is often the bedrock of any e-learning project. Put simply these platforms are designed to allow organisations – corporates or educational establishments to manage learners. In this short video we talk a little about what the LMS does: So as we said, at its simplest a LMS will allow learners to be registered and their learning tracked and recorded, this can be for both online e-learning and other classroom and workplace based learning activities. The fact that an LMS is designed to track and record learning and in particular it is designed to automatically track a learner when using e-learning is very useful to companies who wish to ensure that employees are up to date with their learning. The LMS over the years has grown to offer a vast range of features and functions from scheduling learning, tracking and monitoring learner performance, reminding learners and managers that refreshers are needed to ensure a learner is compliant, and it is e-learning content integrated into an LMS that has made so much of this possible and efficient and effective. The question is, from over 400 LMS offers, which one will work best for your organisation, and its not all about technology: This short video gives you a little more understanding: We hope you agree with us that creating the “learner journey” is a good place to start, IT guys often call this a “Use Case“, and many organisations create learner stories. However, remember it is not just the learner, but the administrator and...

UNESCO Policy guidelines for mobile learning…..what they may mean for the development industry.

The UNESCO paper, entitled Policy Guidelines for Mobile Learning has been recently published, and provides some enthralling examples and ideas as to how Mobile Learning can be used globally for education. With a series of short vignette’s giving examples of innovative use of Mobile Learning, and other ideas of how and when Mobile Learning should be used. Ideas and examples put forward range from the very obvious such as providing immediate feedback, to minimizing educational disruption in conflict or disaster areas. These ideas are both enthralling and often up-lifting. The policy paper highlights the growing availability of mobile devices due, principally to the rapid decline in prices for mobile phone packages. Indeed it is becoming very clear that much of the developing world is bypassing costly fixed infrastructure internet connectivity, and is exhibiting a much lower dependency upon the PC, as mobile becomes the defacto device for digital living and learning. While few would argue with the trends highlighted, what is most interesting in this paper is the policies being advocated by UNESCO for educators globally, and the impact they will have on education service and content providers. UNESCO recommended policies are hugely in favour of the utilisation of Mobile Learning. The paper produces a series of policy recommendations, beginning with three very simple recommendations to policy makers and educationalists: Examine the unique educational potentials and challenges offered by mobile technology and, when appropriate, incorporate these understandings into broader ICT in education policies. Avoid blanket prohibitions of mobile devices. Universal bans, unless implemented for well-considered reasons, are blunt instruments that usually obstruct educational opportunities and inhibit innovation in teaching...

MOOCs and the Corporate e-learning market

How much attention should the corporate e-learning world be paying to the latest developments in the world of Education and e-learning – the rapidly arriving MOOC revolution! There is no doubt that education technologies have had a considerable impact on corporate e-learning market before, but that was mainly the Moodle effect, with an open source education orientated LMS being launched into the corporate e-learning market with considerable success. While this success was initially based on price, quality and innovation soon followed So what effect will MOOCs have on the corporate L&D e-learning market we ask? The MOOC model is about to be hugely disruptive in the world of HE in particular, and new business models are emerging as three principle players (the MOOC platform operators) make their moves. In one corner is edX, a not for profit MOOC with many leading US universities investing in this platform, including MIT, Harvard and Berkley and in the other corner are two for profit organisations…Udacity and Courserra….(there are others), but it is on these three competitors that much attention is being focused, as all seem to be moving aggressively to grab market share, monetize and consequently massively disrupt the education market in the process. The Chronicle of higher education http://chronicle.com/article/What-You-Need-to-Know-About/133475/ provides useful background to the MOOC market. All three organisations are making large grabs for universities to join their eco-systems, use their platforms and crucially generate revenues for them. The revenue share models vary platform by platform. The challenge to the established university is what to do…..wait and see, or get into the market by joining one of the three or four...

What we will see at Learning Technologies 2013

As my inbox fills up with invites to visit stands at Learning Technologies, and Training Press releases gets busier and busier with announcements of launches and seminars, we know Learning Technologies is fully upon us. As well as our usual review based on visiting what is probably Europe’s most exciting show for e-learning and learning technologies, it may be fun to make some not totally uninformed predictions of what we are likely to see  at LTs 2013. We anticipate a very busy show, with the new for 2013 “all one floor format” being particularly beneficial by integrating learning and skills zone with the learning technologies zone. The show has filled up with exhibitors and record numbers of delegates are expected….so what will they see…….these are Learning Lights predictions: Apps and apps and probably more apps, is a “run away” certainty this year, with i-pads a plenty, and other tablet devices no doubt being hugely popular. This new boost to e-learning will prompt discussions around HTML5 and Flash, Native apps and Web apps, and responsive web design as buyers look at the host of differing solutions to porting e-learning across tablets and smartphones. Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) may be a term that will appear and prove an interesting conversation for many a buyer and supplier. Which suppliers will be offering virtualisation solutions to really allows a BYOD solution that fully integrates into the corporate intranet? In our view video will play a huge part in unlocking the true potential of learning on i-pads and smartphones, so we anticipate seeing quite an amount of video content, but probably not as...

E-Learning 24/7 blog

A very informative blog from Craig Weiss who offers his opinions around the wide range of e-learning and learning technology products but with an excellent focus on the LMS market and authoring tools. Not much gets past Craig’s eagle eye in the LMS world, and he is not afraid to say what he thinks. It is well worth looking at Craigs...

The Top 20 LMS – Infographic by Capterra

The 20 most popular LMS solutions   I was taken with the infographic produced by Capterra listing the 20 most popular LMS solutions. The Inforgraphic looks at the numbers of customers, numbers of users and gives an on-line score….a measure of the number of social media followers by product. So what does this infographic say: A little bit is mixed up in terms of markets…is our first reaction, and it is important to compare Apples with Apples. This analysis mixed corporate and education users by including Moodle (which in fairness operates in both markets) and pure corporate offers such as Cornerstone and pure education offers such as Schoology or Edmodo. In this infographic Moodle is classified as purely an academic market product, which is not strictly true, and Totara  gets no mentions…..is it included in the Moodle offer, or not yet in the top 20 LMS list. So what observations can we make, well the most startling observations are the ratios between users and customers…….it would be interesting to know the actual figures used for all vendors, but in an earlier blog we published we looked at the Moodle usage levels stating “Over 1.2 million teachers and over 57 million users have used the Moodle VLE in some way or another, in 218 countries and at 66,000 or more actual sites.” This infographic indicates Moodle now has 68,000 sites and 60 million users, while Edmodo has 100,000 sites but only 10 million users. So we can conclude that a lot of schools see classroom collaboration in learning is the next big thing….the Edmodo user numbers and Collaborize Classroom customer...

Movement in the LMS Market with Moodle growing very fast in brand recognition

A survey published by Elearning magazine looking at Learning and Talent Management Systems  predicts strong growth. The research is based on a web based questionnaire covering 26 questions and was completed by 246 organisations. The findings give a good insight into the LMS (learning management system) and TMS (talent management system) market and offers some interesting perspectives. The highlight finding is that the market is expected to experience strong growth, while experiencing downward budgetary pressure! That is certainly a finding our research fully reflects. The buyer wants more for less! This finding is tempered by a decreasing satisfaction in system performance and users craving broader features…….again no surprises here, and the frustration of the learner and the L&D department with the LMS is as real in the UK as in the USA. So what does this research tell us….well firstly it is very US focused, and it indicates a strong desire amongst organisation to improve what they have already (or indeed replace what they have), but that budgets remain under very real downward pressure. Learning professionals will spend less per organisation on their systems – 25% less if the study is correct, but want more for their money. Talent management appears to be retaining interest, and represents 22% of the overall learning and talent system market…up from 16% in 2011, however, frustration with these systems remains very real. Talent management is certainly more evolved in the US than the UK. Cloud has certainly arrived, and of the 245 organisations surveyed, 38% are reporting using a Cloud/SaaS LMS, against 23% hosting on premises, with 19% and 3% for Talent management...

When will the tipping point come for mobile learning?

There is an ever growing conviction, and no shortage of investment in mobile learning technologies by the e-learning industry at present, indicating a firm belief that this is the “now” or “next” big thing! In an industry given over to a little too much hype and excitement in our view, we wonder what will be the actual tipping point for mobile learning in a world of tightly constrained L& D budgets? Well, in short we believe it will be with the emergence of Mobile Business Strategies and Mobile Device Management Software.   To add to the clamour and hype of mlearning, the rise of BYOD – Bring Your Own Device, with employees (and students and school children) all wishing to bring their own smartphone and tablet to the workplace or learn place, an interesting new phenomena is emerging. The potential for mobile learning has been well understood for some years, but has never really broken through, due in part to the limitations of mobile devices and networks and issues around content. This clearly is no longer the case, as smartphones and tablets are now well suited towards specific learning genres…….this is indeed the new “learning mix” challenge, as we go beyond the traditional “blended learning” model! Some interesting early studies have been published as to how these devices are being used….there are notable differences in how i-pads are used compared to Android powered tablets for instance. Studies are emerging to the types of activities smartphones are used for….Texting, talking, checking e-mails, retrieving information, locational services, playing games etc…sadly non thought to research if learning activities were being undertaken. The...

Has e-learning progressed in the last 6 years?

It is very informative to read the excellent publication from UfI Charitable trust:  Scaling Up – Achieving a Breakthrough in Adult Learning with Technology where a team of researchers have interviewed a great number of influential individuals in this world of e-learning and learning technology. The report opens with the following rather disappointing, but probably quite realistic  statement “DIGITAL TECHNOLOGIES are altering the way we work, trade, buy things, play, communicate, arrange holidays, pay taxes and have a social life, but so far – despite subsidy and encouragement – have made a disappointing impact on how we learn in formal contexts.” Indeed in a recent post made by one of the UfI reports authors Seb Schmoller, who takes to task the levels of funding made available to the then UfI managed Learndirect organisation and the limited results achieved we can see the scale of subsidy and partial disappointment illustrated. On a micro scale this charge could also be levelled at Learning Light (2006-8). Another of the UfI reports authors Clive Shepherd recently posted an interesting blog piece entitled “Why is e-learning so unpopular” again giving rise to the concerns that after a 30 year legacy e-learning is still struggling for mainstream acceptance from L&D departments and learners. Both Clive and Charles Jennings….another of the UfI reports authors both identify a failing to promote and showcase e-learning effectively to quote Charles “We just haven’t been bold enough and shouted our successes from the rooftops.” The report puts together a series of well thought through actions that need to be taken to deliver on the promise of digital technologies or learning...